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Oklahoma Historical Society

#ThisDayInHistory On October 20, 1931, Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma. He grew up in Commerce, Oklahoma, and was known as the “Commerce Comet.” Mantle went on to have a remarkable 18-year career playing professional baseball for the New York Yankees. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. Learn more at bit.ly/MickeyMantleOK. (2012.201.B0415B.0275, Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, OHS) #Baseball #HomeRun

Oklahoma Historical Society

#ThisDayInHistory On October 20, 1931, Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma. He grew up in Commerce, Oklahoma, and was known as the “Commerce Comet.” Mantle went on to have a remarkable 18-year career playing professional baseball for the New York Yankees. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. Learn more at bit.ly/MickeyMantleOK. (2012.201.B0415B.0275, Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, OHS) #Baseball #HomeRun

OsiyoTV

Check out your inside look at this week's all-new episode of #OsiyoTV! 👀📺 This week, ride along with young Cherokee trick rider Sophie Duch, meet Cathy Abercrombie, a 3rd generation weaver, plus see the interesting life Phil Konstantin has led at NASA and the California Highway Patrol. All this and more is coming up Thursday, Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. CST right here and at osiyo.tv. 🎉 We're also broadcasting over the weekend and all episodes are always at your fingertips. #OsiyoTVSeason6 #AlwaysFreeAlwaysStreaming

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#thisdayinhistory On April 19, 1995, at 9:02 a.m. a 4,800-pound ammonium nitrate–fuel oil bomb exploded in a Ryder truck parked at the north entrance of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring approximately 850. At the time, the bombing was the nation’s worst single act of domestic terrorism. The governor’s office reported that 30 children were orphaned, 219 children lost at least one parent, 462 people were left homeless, and 7,000 people lost their workplace. The City of Oklahoma City’s Final Report estimated property damage to more than 300 buildings in a 48-square-block area. Learn more at bit.ly/4-19-1995. Today, #weremember those who were killed, those who survived, and those changed forever by the tragedy on April 19, 1995. Photo by Jim Argo (2012.201.B0959.0179, Oklahoma Publishing Company Photography Collection, OHS) #okhistory #25YearsAgo #dayofremembrance post credit: @okhistory

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